Stimulation approaches for pain therapy and stroke recovery

We welcome you to join us for this eWEAR Seminar on Thursday 3/25 from 10:00 am to 11:30 am PDT

Registration: Please click here to register

Speakers:
Dr. Caitlyn Seim
10:00 am to 10:30 am
“Investigating Wearable Vibrotactile Stimulation to Assist Recovery After Stroke”

Prof. Xiang Qian
10:30 am to 11:30 am
“Peripheral Nerve Stimulation”

Dr. Caitlyn Seim

National Institute of Health Postdoctoral Fellow in Mechanical Engineering
Stanford University

Bio

Dr. Caitlyn Seim works in the Collaborative Haptics and Robotics in Medicine (CHARM) Lab with Allison Okamura and is co-advised by Maarten Lansberg in the department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences.  In 2019, Caitlyn received a PhD in Human-Centered Computing from the School of Interactive Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology, advised by Thad Starner.  She earned a bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering with Highest Honors from the Georgia Institute of Technology in May 2013. Dr. Seim is the recent recipient of an Interdisciplinary Scholar Award from the Stanford Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute.  Dr. Seim’s goal is to develop new methods of improving limb function impaired by brain injury. Building on the growing evidence that vibrotactile stimulation may facilitate recovery, she has designed a new wearable device that provides stimulation for extended periods of time and allows a treatment in the background of daily life – enabling an intensive, mobile intervention that is accessible even to those who cannot perform traditional exercises due to low dexterity.

Abstract
Stroke is a leading cause of disability both in the United States and globally. Limited arm and hand function after a stroke can be a major challenge to a survivor’s independence and return to a healthy life. There is promising preliminary data on the potential impact of tactile stimulation for limb recovery, but current apparatus used to apply this stimulation limit research to short, laboratory studies. By designing a wireless, wearable device to apply this stimulation, treatment can occur for hours each day during daily life. Currently there are many barriers to a successful recovery after stroke, such as limited access to clinics and adherence to therapy routines. This work aims to evaluate a low-cost and mobile aide to recovery. Results of a preliminary trial found significant changes in tactile perception and muscle tone after eight weeks using a stimulation device daily. 

 

Xiang Qian

Professor Xiang Qian

Clinical Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
Stanford University

Bio

Xiang Qian, MD, PhD, is a Pain Management Physician and Clinical Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University. He is also the Stanford Facial Pain Program Co-Director for interdisciplinary pain patient care at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. Dr. Qian’s clinical interests include the treatment of acute and chronic pain for migraine, trigeminal neuralgia, glossopharyngeal neuralgia, hemifacial spasm, atypical facial pain, and others. Dr. Qian leads the CT-guided interventional pain program and is the recipient of the Stanford Translational and Clinical Innovation Award. Dr. Qian is the faculty professor of Stanford Wearable Electronics Initiative and works with colleagues from the engineering school to develop a wirelessly powered, mini-implantable nerve stimulator. Dr. Qian is the Medical Director of Stanford International Medical Services and fosters care for international patients and promotes international collaborations. Dr. Qian completed his residency and fellowship training at Stanford. He received his PhD degree in Physiology and Biophysics from University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and postdoctoral training in Neuroscience at UCSF. Dr. Qian founded the Chinese American Physicians’ Society to advance medical knowledge internationally.

Abstract
In the United States chronic pain affects approximately 100 million patients and millions of others experience acute pain following surgery. Many of these patients rely on opioids chronically resulting in national opioid crisis. The need for non-opioid pain management options has never been higher. FDA-cleared peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) was developed to help address this need.  Although PNS was initially described as a treatment for pain as early as in the late 1960’s, it was not until recently PNS has become a standard of care to treat both acute and chronic pain conditions. Recent developments in waveform and nerve stimulation technology have further brought promising potential advancements to the PNS field.  At this talk, I will describe the history of PNS, current clinical indications of PNS, and future directions and opportunities.